Welcome to the Children’s Ministry page!  This is a unique time, and so we are endeavouring to come alongside you in unique ways.  

Here you will find several resources for you to consider as you and your child are invited to explore a Bible story every week and grow!  

The lesson plan is an overview for you, the caregiver.  The student leaflet is filled with ‘at home’ activities.  The bulletin is a ‘paper and pencil’ activity page that uses the week’s theme to assist in learning.  These resources are explained in greater detail in the lesson plan. 

If you do not have a printer and would like paper copies of this material, please contact me, Beverly at beverly@ebap.ca.  
 

Here is a suggested pathway through the lesson, though you are welcome to just choose whatever you like and work with that! 

1) Read through lesson plan by yourself. 

2) View the Whirl episode with your child. 

3) Discuss the questions in the lesson plan found in the ‘Welcome’ section.  

4) View ‘Beverly’s Bible Blurb’ and look up the week’s Bible passage. 

5) Read and discuss the questions found in the ‘Hear’ section of the lesson plan. 

6)Choose activities from the bulletin, and student leaflet.

7) Pray with your child.  
 
Thanks! Have fun!
 

Beverly Toth

Director of Family/Children’s Ministries

Emmanuel Baptist Church

(306) 477-1234 Ext. 143

 

May 2 NEIGHBOR

Lesson Title: The Good Samaritan
Scripture: Luke 10: 25-37
Our theme is NEIGHBOR
 
 

What is happening in this story? 

Jesus’ parable of the good Samaritan is told in response to a question posed by a lawyer – not the equivalent of a modern-day attorney, but a scholar of the Jewish law:  “What must I do to inherit eternal life?”  When Jesus directs him to the very law the lawyer knows so well, he seems disappointed that love of God and neighbor is the answer.  He presses Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”-hoping it seems, to wriggle out of having to serve people he doesn’t like.  With the parable, then, Jesus turns the question around, saying, essentially, ‘Don’t worry about who is a neighbor to you.  Go and be a neighbor to everyone else.’

Why does this story matter for kids? 

With its vivid events and characters, this story told by Jesus makes a strong impression on kids.  Their imaginations can easily picture the hurt man by the road, the priest and Levite walking by without stopping, and the Samaritan bandaging the man’s wounds and taking him on his own beast to a place where he can rest and recover.  Whither or not you opt to explain the prejudice between Jewish and Samaritan people of the day, kids can grasp the power of showing kindness to someone in need. 

Why this theme? 

It’s important for kids to realize that we have more neighbors beyond the people who live next door to us.  The world is full of different kinds of people, all of whom are our neighbors. 
 
 
Video Segments
*The password for all videos is Whirl
 

 

 

Taken directly from Whirl Sunday School Curriculum 2016

Whirl Classroom Sunday School Curriculum. Sparkhouse, 2016.


Apr 25 EVANGELISM

Lesson Title: The Great Commission
Scripture: Matt. 28: 16-20
Our theme is EVANGELISM
 
 

What is happening in this story? 

Matthew presents Jesus as the one promised in the Old Testament-both sovereign king and humble servant.  This is very different from what most people anticipated in a Messiah.  Followers of Jesus are invited into the understanding that God’s kingdom is both present and future, now and not yet.  One day it will be fulfilled completely.  However, in the meantime, we are to follow the ways of Jesus and lead others into a life that changes things both here and now, and for all eternity.  

Why does this story matter for kids?  

Kids – especially younger ones – know what it’s like to be excited to share.  Whether sharing toys, stories, or just information, kids know this impulse well.  While challenging for some church communities, evangelism, at its core, is simply this fervent desire to share with others something that gives us joy.  When we truly experience the love of God and the good news of Jesus, we are compelled to share it through our words and deeds.  

Why this theme? 

Evangelism comes directly from the Greek for ‘gospel’ or ‘good news.’  What better news is there than the assurance that Jesus is with us ‘always, to the end of the age”?  Whenever we share Jesus’ teachings and love with others, we evangelize – we spread the good news.  Kids are some of the very best at doing this. 
 
 
Video Segments
*The password for all videos is Whirl
 
 
 

Taken directly from Whirl Sunday School Curriculum 2016

Whirl Classroom Sunday School Curriculum. Sparkhouse, 2016.


Apr 18 BELIEVE

Lesson Title: Thomas Believes
Scripture: John 20: 19-31
Our theme is BELIEVE
 
 

What’s happening in this story?  

Jesus’ grace – not Thomas’s doubt – is the focus of this story.  Thomas is a follower of Jesus with some questions – questions similar to those the other disciples had, and got answered, when Jesus appeared among them one week earlier.  But Thomas was not there when Jesus appeared to the others, and he was not going to be fooled.  People do not, as a rule, rise from the dead.  He needed to know this wasn’t a hoax – he needed to see and touch Jesus’ wounds.  Jesus gives Thomas exactly what he says he needs.  Thomas responds in faith with the words “My Lord and my God!”

What does this story mean for kids? 

Kids understand the need to question, and can identify with Thomas.  They probably have many questions about this story, in fact – questions that should be encouraged.  It is important for kids to know that God loves questions; that Jesus encouraged questions in his teaching and storytelling; and that Thomas’s critical thinking and desire to be sure are important aspects of faith, just as they are important in other realms of life.  God never asks us to sign onto something glibly.  

Why this theme? 

Belief isn’t something that is above doubt.  Kids will have questions – everyone doubts at some point in their life.  But this story reminds us that true belief comes from asking questions, that faith is interwoven with doubt and grows from it.  
 
 
Video Segments
*The password for all videos is Whirl
 
 

 

 

Taken directly from Whirl Sunday School Curriculum 2016

Whirl Classroom Sunday School Curriculum. Sparkhouse, 2016.


Apr 11 RECOGNIZE

Lesson Title: The Road to Emmaus
Scripture: Luke 24:13-35
Our theme is RECOGNIZE
 
 

What’s happening in this story? 

We enter this story focused on two disciples who are confused and still mostly in disbelief about the good news of Jesus’ resurrection.  Jesus meets these two disciples while they are on the road traveling, but they do not recognize him.  As they gather at the table, and Jesus breaks, blesses, and gives bread, all is revealed.  And just as all is revealed – and they are aware of whose presence they have been in that day – Jesus is gone.  

What does this story mean for kids? 

The beauty of “The Road to Emmaus” is that it happened in daily life while Jesus’ followers were talking to friends, walking, eating a meal, and inviting a friend to stay over.  Kids can similarly imagine where Jesus might enter our daily lives – at the grocery story?  The library?  The swimming pool?  Does Jesus walk with us today on the soccer field or at the gym?  You can enter the story by exploring where they might encounter Jesus in their life.  

Why this theme? 

It can sometimes be difficult to remember that – despite the chaos – God is still active and present in the world.  The response is not to dismiss God’s role, but to search it out.  To look for and praise the moments when we recognize Jesus at work among us.  

 
 
Video Segments
Note: The password for the videos this week is different than usual. It is the word ‘connect’.
 
Preschool – K
This week, please refer to the Gr 1-2 materials for Preschool – K
Gr 1-2
 
Gr 3-4
 
Gr 5-6
 

 

 

Taken directly from Whirl Sunday School Curriculum 2016

Whirl Classroom Sunday School Curriculum. Sparkhouse, 2016.


Apr 4 SURPRISE

Lesson Title: Jesus is Risen!
Scripture: John 20:1-18
Our theme is SURPRISE
 
 

What’s happening in this story? 

This morning begins with confusion:  Mary Magdalene arrives in the garden to find the stone moved and the tomb empty!  Disciples arrive, then angels, and finally Jesus himself.  Out of the confusion, hope emerges, and Mary becomes the first to proclaim the good news that Jesus  has risen from the dead!

What does this story mean for kids?  

The story of Easter morning ends with Mary running to tell the disciples, ‘I have seen the Lord!’  We too, are called to proclaim the good news.  That’s the mission of our church bodies – no matter how fancy the words in our mission statement, we are called to proclaim the good news.  God is always at work.  In this story, kids learn that death and destruction are never the last word.  Grace, hope, and joy finish out the story.  

Why this theme?  

Many kids have already heard this story many times over the years in church and Sunday school.  But help them imagine the shock – the surprise! – of Mary and the disciples when they first realized Jesus was resurrected and had defeated death.  Help kids grasp that it was way more surprising than finding hidden Easter eggs or unwrapping a present in a box.  What if Jesus, his face beaming in love for us, walked through the door right now.   Easter is something like that!
 
 
Video Segments
*The password for all videos is Whirl
 

 

 

Taken directly from Whirl Sunday School Curriculum 2016

Whirl Classroom Sunday School Curriculum. Sparkhouse, 2016.


Mar 28 SUFFERING

Lesson Title: Luke’s Holy Week
Scripture: Luke 22:14-23; Luke 23:26-56
Our theme is SUFFERING
 

 

What’s happening in this story? 

While the story of Jesus’ crucifixion and death is covered in every gospel, Luke in particular emphasizes the physical and social reality of death on the cross.  For instance, whereas John sometimes uses metaphorical terms to describe the crucifixion (Jesus is ‘lifted up’), Luke wants to emphasize that Jesus fully understands suffering, pain, mockery, and death.  Simply put, there is nothing we can experience that is beyond the experience of God. 

What does this story mean for kids? 

Kids are likely to have a lot of questions: Why did God let this happen?  Did Jesus really die?  Is this a good or a bad story?  Such questions have been asked since the crucifixion itself.  Kids will likely be troubled by Jesus’ suffering and may ask how suffering shows love.  There are at least two ways in which you might respond:  First, we learn that God’s power and grace are bigger than anything that can happen in the world – even death.  Second, we learn that Jesus understands our pain and suffering.  This includes bullying, abuse, teasing, betrayal, and loss taken to the greatest extreme.  Kids need to know that Jesus intimately understands and can empathize with whatever pain they might go through.  

Why this theme?  

Jesus experienced deep, terrible suffering.  He knows what it’s like to suffer and can empathize with us when we go through tragedy or difficult times.  Jesus’ suffering was real, and it shows us God’s great love for us.  
 
 
Video Segments
*The password for all videos is Whirl
 

 

 

Taken directly from Whirl Sunday School Curriculum 2016

Whirl Classroom Sunday School Curriculum. Sparkhouse, 2016.


Mar 21 LOVE

Lesson Title: The Greatest Commandment
Scripture: Matthew 22:34-40
Our theme is LOVE
 

 

What’s happening in this story?  

First, it should be noted that the Pharisees in this passage were not asking innocent questions.  They were hoping to trap Jesus.  Second, if you ask Christians,”How many commandments are there?” most will answer,”10″.  But first-century Jewish people would have answered, “There are 613”.  With so many commandments to keep track of, there was always a desire to organize and prioritize them, so the Pharisees’ question was not new.  But Jesus gave a profound response.  Jesus pointed out that all 613 commandments came from one source:  Loving God with all your heart and soul and mind.  

What does this story mean for kids?

Kids who have been part of a faith community have likely started to learn about the Ten Commandments.  Hopefully, they are learning that the commandments are not just a list of dos and don’ts.  Rather, they are guides to living a meaningful and full life – another way in which God provides for and blesses us.  

Why this theme?

Love for God and neighbor is the focus and purpose of all the commandments.  Kids may struggle to memorize the ten most famous commandments (imagine trying to remember all 613!), and words like adultery and covet are well beyond them at this age.  How fortunate that when we know “Love God; love others,” we know all we need to know.  
 
 
Video Segments
*The password for all videos is Whirl
 
 
 
 

Taken directly from Whirl Sunday School Curriculum 2016

Whirl Classroom Sunday School Curriculum. Sparkhouse, 2016.


Mar 14 SHEPHERD

Lesson Title: Jesus the Good Shepherd
Scripture: John 10: 11-18
Our theme is SHEPHERD
 
 

What is happening in this story?

In this story, Jesus likens his relationship with his followers to that of a good shepherd with his sheep.  The shepherd and sheep know each other intimately, recognize each other’s voices, and trust each other.  The shepherd even goes so far as to lay down his life for the sake of the sheep.  When we let Jesus be our shepherd, the relationship between us is as close as that between Jesus and God, whom he calls ‘the Father’. 

Why does this story matter for kids? 

This is a comfort story for kids, one they’ve likely heard before in Sunday school – complete with a cotton ball sheep activity.  While they will hear that Jesus loves them, they will likely also notice the responsibility in the story.  Jesus the shepherd protects his sheep – us – even to the point of giving his life.  Whether they grasp that or just live with the reassurance of Christ’s love for them, the point remains:  Jesus is good; Jesus is our shepherd.  

Why this theme?  

The proclamation that the Good Shepherd knows his sheep is a major theme, inviting important discussions regarding identity and our longing to be known and accepted.  The reference to ‘other sheep’ is also key:  the earlier kids start learning that faith is not ‘all about us,’ the better.  
 
 
 
Video Segments
*The password for all videos is Whirl
 
 

 

 

Taken directly from Whirl Sunday School Curriculum 2016

Whirl Classroom Sunday School Curriculum. Sparkhouse, 2016.


Mar 7 IDENTITY

Lesson Title: The Transfiguration
Scripture: Luke 9: 28-36
Our theme is IDENTITY
 
 

What’s happening in this story? 

Jesus and his closest companions journey to a mountaintop to pray.  What follows is an intense mystical experience in which Jesus’ clothes become dazzling white, the prophets Moses and Elijah appear, and the cloud of God’s presence declares Jesus ‘my Son, my Chosen.’  The location, paired with Jesus’ divinely glowing appearance, mirrors other mountaintop experiences of God’s presence in the Bible.  The episode makes a powerful statement about Jesus’ identity and authority.  

What does this story mean for Kids?  

This story focuses on Jesus’ identity – he’s the ‘real deal’!  Yet God is mysterious and stretches the limits of our understanding.  We adults don’t have to try to explain everything rationally for kids in our care.  They will learn that an important part of our discipleship is wondering about such mysteries and being in awe, just like the first disciples were.  

Why this theme?  

Identity is, very likely, an abstract topic for most kids.  However, with Jesus, kids will be able to gain first understandings about what it means.  When Jesus is proclaimed God’s chosen and beloved Son, we learn more about the identity of Jesus – and God. 
 
 
 
Video Segments
*The password for all videos is Whirl
 
 

 

 

Taken directly from Whirl Sunday School Curriculum 2016

Whirl Classroom Sunday School Curriculum. Sparkhouse, 2016.


Feb 28 APPEARANCES

Lesson Title: The Widow’s Offering
Scripture: Mark 12: 38-44
Our theme is APPEARANCES
 
 

What’s happening in this story? 

Mark 12 includes a series of public arguments between Jesus and religious leaders in the temple.  In this story, Jesus criticized the scribes, describing much of what they do as being for the sake of appearances.  Then Jesus observes and compares the monetary contributions of many rich people with the offering of a poor widow.  Both episodes follow the pattern of Jesus’ teaching that “the first shall be last and the last shall be first.”

What does this story mean for kids? 

What we do with everything entrusted to us says a lot about who we are and whose we are.  Jesus calls us to give from the heart, trusting that God is a God of abundance.  Kids surely have much less money to place in the offering plate than adults at church do.  Help them know that Jesus values their small gifts highly when they give out of love for God  

Why this theme?  

The motivations for our actions are important to Jesus The widow is praised because her offering comes from a sincere desire to please God and help others.  Kids can learn from her example about giving and serving in love. 
 
 
 
Video Segments
*The password for all videos is Whirl
 
 

 

 

Taken directly from Whirl Sunday School Curriculum 2016

Whirl Classroom Sunday School Curriculum. Sparkhouse, 2016.